Tracking Mangroves in the United States: Where? Why? and What’s Next?

Mangrove forests occupy a unique ecological niche in inter-tidal zones of the world’s tropics and subtropics, and their extent and health have important implications for both science and policy. In the conterminous United States, these warm temperature- and saltwater- loving trees only grow in three states: Texas, Louisiana, and Florida. However, these forests are highly…

Sediment Dredging Harms Miami Coral Reef

Corals are being stressed by so many things nowadays. For example, they must cope with living in warmer water that can lead to coral bleaching and die-off. On top of this, humans are making the situation even worse by dredging up coral reefs and smothering nearby reefs with the dredged sediment. Sedimentation on reefs can…

How to Renourish a Beach with a Forgotten Past: Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

A lot of beaches are eroding, basically washing away, because they aren’t getting enough natural sediment to replenish themselves. One reason for this is that we have built hard structures along beaches (like jetties, ports, harbors, and factories) that block sand from being naturally pushed along by waves; sand gets stuck behind these structures and…

The Levee Dilemma

Levees, those wonderful walls that protect us and our land from destructive floods, come with a dark little secret – they protect us today but doom us tomorrow. Levees are walls that run along the shoreline of a body of water and can be either natural or man-made. Levees can naturally form by sediment settling…