Making My Way From Mountains To Mud: Part 3

We teach school children that science is inaccessible and scientists are socially inept. Crazy scientists hide behind lab benches. They are disguised beneath white coats and thick glasses. Their hair is disheveled, their motivations shady, their sentences long and entangled in complexity. I wasn’t impressed with this type of science. My journey into science wasn’t … Continue reading Making My Way From Mountains To Mud: Part 3

Tracking Mangroves in the United States: Where? Why? and What’s Next?

Mangrove forests occupy a unique ecological niche in inter-tidal zones of the world’s tropics and subtropics, and their extent and health have important implications for both science and policy. In the conterminous United States, these warm temperature- and saltwater- loving trees only grow in three states: Texas, Louisiana, and Florida. However, these forests are highly … Continue reading Tracking Mangroves in the United States: Where? Why? and What’s Next?

Making My Way From Mountains To Mud: Part 2

With the March for Science coming up, I've been thinking a lot about science advocacy and the public's relationship with science. I've learned that distrust between scientists and the general public goes both ways and that scientists have a responsibility to be both a voice for science as well as an ear to the public. Luckily for me, … Continue reading Making My Way From Mountains To Mud: Part 2

A Step-by-Step Guide to Academic Puberty: Transitioning from a Graduate Student to a Young Professional

Today, for International Women's Day, I'm throwing my love for mud up on a shelf to talk about a broader and more impactful topic: being a young (female) professional in a STEM field. Yes, it can sometimes make you feel insignificant and powerless, but it can also spark up a fire of determination and sisterhood … Continue reading A Step-by-Step Guide to Academic Puberty: Transitioning from a Graduate Student to a Young Professional